Time Saving Hacks with Google Form Quizzes

Google Forms is a quick and easy way to give an assessment, but it can be time consuming with all of the clicking necessary to make quizzes.  Here is a short video that will walk you through some time saving tips.  (Last week I actually wrote out a post with these directions, but decided on a video instead.)

You can view all of the Tech Bytes on YouTube.

 

Reset student responses in quizzes in Google Forms

If you are using the new Google Forms for quizzes and have it set to allow only response, but then find yourself needing to let a student take the quiz again you can work some form magic to do it.  It will delete the student’s original response, but if you’re ok with that follow these directions.

From Forms itself:

Click on responses.

2016-08-13_13-35-33

 

 

 

 

Choose the student’s name under who has responded.

2016-08-13_13-51-43

 

 

 

 

 

Then hit the trash button.  This will delete the student’s response from the form and the form will allow them to do it again.

2016-08-13_13-52-32

 

 

 

You can also do this in the Google Sheet associated with your your Form.

In Forms click on responses.

Click on the green cross icon to open up the sheet.

If it asks, tell it you want to create a new sheet.  (If you’ve already done this it won’t ask.)

In the sheet, right click on the number next to the row of the student who you want to be able to re-take the test.  Choose “delete row”.  Now the student will be able to re-take it because the sheet no longer sees their name.

2016-08-13_13-41-07

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now the student will be able to re-submit the form!

Google Forms Quiz for Exit Tickets

I’m so excited to use the new Google Forms quiz feature, but I doubt that I will use it much for quizzes.  I can see using this feature as a quick exit ticket.  I’m going to ask my students five to seven questions at the end of each lesson based on the lesson objectives.  Because I know what the objective is, I can create these quizzes ahead of time and because they are so easy to edit, if we don’t explore something as much as I had hoped I can easily change them.  Or, if there is a magical teaching moment in class, then I can edit them on the fly.  (I think of magical teaching moments are those times in class when something happens and it is so funny, or so memorable or so whatever that it just becomes part of the classroom culture.) Then, I am going to use the feedback feature for right and wrong questions to tell students what to do next.

I can see several applications for this new feature including:

  • Did you tell a story in class?  Upload a video of you telling the main story and ask questions about it.  (Of course your class version will be different.)  If the student gets the question right, ask them a follow up question in the feedback.  If they get it wrong, ask them to review the video.  I particularly am excited about this because I’ve had students ask to be able to hear the story more and this would be a great way to check their understanding.
  • Writing practice.  Yes, a boring close activity, but ask students several fill in the blank questions.  If they get it right – great!  If they get it wrong, direct them to review their notes (or a webpage or an activity or whatever you deem appropriate.)
  • No Homework Pass!  If students get above a certain score they don’t have to do homework that evening.  I think I would use this selectively and I would have enough questions on there that I would feel certain that they had a good grasp of the objectives.  I also wouldn’t tell them it was an option until the very end of the quiz.
  • Have an #authres you are using as an IPA?  Give quick feedback to students for them to know if they are understanding correctly.  If they get it wrong, you can even direct them to a more scaffolded version of the #authres to try again.