Time Saving Hacks with Google Form Quizzes

Google Forms is a quick and easy way to give an assessment, but it can be time consuming with all of the clicking necessary to make quizzes.  Here is a short video that will walk you through some time saving tips.  (Last week I actually wrote out a post with these directions, but decided on a video instead.)

You can view all of the Tech Bytes on YouTube.

 

5 Ways to Use Google Q and A

I love using Google’s Q and A feature to get students talking.  In a 1-1 classroom it’s an efficient way to ask a question and elicit a response from the entire class; or rather from each student.  Here’s five ways you can use Google Slides.

Last week we were working on questions.  Students wrote questions about a story I had told and then I asked them to choose two to input into Slide Q & A.  When they were writing I told them not to worry about whether they could answer the questions (in French), so when they wrote their questions into Q & A, I had them “like” the ones they could answer.  I instantly knew which ones I could expect an answer for and which ones I couldn’t and then we answered the ones that were answerable.  Here is a sample (mistakes and all!)

student questions in French

The best part about Q & A is that it doesn’t have to be just for questions!  In fact, the first time I saw it I thought, “Questions? What?  I’m going to have them write responses!”

 

list of ways to use q and a

Learn how to start Slides Q and A here.

 

Starting Google Q and A

Slides Q and A is an efficient way to elicit student responses.  This embedded video shows you how to start a Slide Q & A session.

 

Yelp Template

Write a Review

I made a French Yelp template for Google Slides for an assessment last week.  It has a place for students to write two reviews.  I wanted to design a prompt that would have students using the past tense and wouldn’t you know it-that’s what you do in a Yelp Review!  Quelle coïncidence!!  (Yelp.fr even made it easy by asking “Êtes-vous venu ici?” and “Vous êtes allé dans ces commerces?”  Merci Yelp!  It also fit in nicely with our class discussion of why French people come to visit our desert area.)

french yelp templateIf this weren’t going to be a formal assessment, I would make it a collaborative slide by duplicating a whole bunch of slides, sharing it as “students can edit”and then asking students write a review and then to respond to a another student’s review.  There are stars off to the side to drag in to make it more “official.”  It’s also in 8.5 x 11″ format in case I wanted to (gasp!) print.  Share in Google Classroom as “make a copy for each student.”

Click on the link or image to view the template.

Yelp Template

 

#edublogsclub – Student Privacy

Having just attended an EdTech Summit on Friday in which there was an hour and half presentation by a lawyer about the laws and regulations governing student privacy,  you’d imagine I’d have something interesting to add to this topic…but not so much.

In addition to making sure that I do my best to insure student privacy and follow the law, this year I added an extra layer to my own students’ privacy.  I do a lot of workshops and trainings on Google Classroom and it’s helpful that I have an actual class in there to demonstrate.  This semester I set up an “Extra Credit Class” for my college students and told them that if they were ok with me displaying their work on a projector to show teachers how Classroom works to join that Classroom.   It’s my own way of making sure that I am honoring their rights to their digital work.

Adding Video in Google Slides

Google announced a new feature and I am ecstatic.  You now can add videos directly from your Google Drive!  They don’t have to be on YouTube!!! (If you’re on a school Google account, this feature may not be available just yet depending on how your administrator has set up for rolling out new features.  Just give it a week or two.  You’ll know because when you click on Insert>Video there will be a choice that says Google Drive.)

This means we can add listening or speaking activities to our Google Slides via videos!!

  1.  Create a video using a device.  This might be easiest on a phone, but you can use any device. (I did the example on my phone.  I covered up the camera, but you can also just point to a nice picture.)
  2. Upload this to your Google Drive.  (You’ll need the Google Drive app on your phone.)  Make sure you set the permissions to anyone with the link can view – not sure if this will automatically fix itself if you share in Google Classroom, but why take a chance.
  3. Create your slide and insert it.

Why?

Why would we want to do this?  Endless awesome reasons.

  1.  Differentiation- Give students different slightly different directions or a slightly different task.  Give a baseline version and a challenge version.  Example for clothes- have a #authres of some clothes choices.  In different videos ask them what they would wear to a party, to the beach, for a wedding.  Or describe what someone has chosen to wear to one of those places and ask the students if it was an appropriate choice and to explain.  Or give them a different amount to spend and have them say what they would buy.  They can write their answers or discuss.
  2. Choice- Students love choices for tasks.
  3. Working with a story?  Put some images and then tell different stories and have students move the images around to match what you’re saying.  Or change the story slightly and have them react.
  4. I can’t stop thinking of ways this can be used!

In this example I added a video to a third slide of my prepositions Interactive Slides.

Video and Slides

 

 

Open Mind Interactive Slides

I’ve been working on a presentation on reading strategies and updated my “Open Mind” Template for Google Slides.  An “Open Mind” activity is pretty simple.  Students insert words or images into the mind of a character or person they’ve been reading about.  (For example for Romeo Montague a student could put a heart and say that Romeo is in love.)  This works particularly well for language learners because they can insert an image and then talk about why they chose that image.  Since it’s a Google slide, you could also have students do it collaboratively- two working on it at the same time or even put several in a slide deck and ask students to fill in for different characters and then students could guess which character was which or explain to each other why they think those particular images were chosen. Students can justify their answer in the speaker notes portion of the slides.

I’ve included two templates in the slide deck.  One is a basic open mind and the second is a “says, does, and thinks” where students separate out what the character says, does and thinks.  I also like this one for language learners because it gives them practice using structures like “he thinks that…” “she says that…”  If you were working on the subjunctive you could also use for wants and wishes.  So much fun!

Click on the photos to make a copy of the Open Mind Template.

open mind
Blank open mind
Thinks, says, does Open Mind
Thinks, Says, Does Open Mind

 

Collaborative Magnetic Poetry (French) – Interactive Slide

Collaborative Magnetic PoetryI made a collaborative slide activity for creating sentences.  Students drag the cards onto the slide to create different sentences.  It’s a round about way to talk about grammar.  Once the students get all done- the different colored cards can help facilitate a discussion about grammar.  What do you notice about all of the red cards?  The green?  The yellow?  I didn’t have a chance to test this out with my students – though I’ve done this many times with actual cards.  The benefit of the technology is more for the teacher in that you can change the cards easily and not have to spend all day at the copier and paper cutter.

Students all edit the same Slide deck so at the end you can cycle through all of their creations easily.

The subjects are all rather crazy- based on a story I tell at the beginning of the year.  Plus, the more “interesting” the cards are the more creative students get with their sentences.  They can tell a story or just write sentences.  This version doesn’t have any connecting words; just subjects, verbs and some prepositional phrases for the most part and so it’s meant for some pretty early Novices.  The “cards” are mostly off the slide so that there’s plenty of room to make sentences.

Collaborative Magnetic Poetry Interactive Slide

 

Voice Typing to Practice Numbers

I am always up for some good number practice.  In my perfect lesson plan there would be some attention to numbers every day- I just feel like students always need more practice.  Of course, there’s a ton of ways for students to practice listening to numbers, but not so many for them to practice speaking on their own.

Google Voice Typing to the Rescue!

2016-09-18_18-28-48

I created this document and video to explain what to do for students to practice their numbers.  Basically, students say the number in the TL and Google recognizes their voice and fills in the number.  Though not perfect; it’s pretty darn good.  Of course, I chose the numbers that give early learners the most difficulty and the ones which they mix up the most.

Voice Type Numbers Document

Video Explaining How it Works (for students)

Google Forms Quiz for Exit Tickets

I’m so excited to use the new Google Forms quiz feature, but I doubt that I will use it much for quizzes.  I can see using this feature as a quick exit ticket.  I’m going to ask my students five to seven questions at the end of each lesson based on the lesson objectives.  Because I know what the objective is, I can create these quizzes ahead of time and because they are so easy to edit, if we don’t explore something as much as I had hoped I can easily change them.  Or, if there is a magical teaching moment in class, then I can edit them on the fly.  (I think of magical teaching moments are those times in class when something happens and it is so funny, or so memorable or so whatever that it just becomes part of the classroom culture.) Then, I am going to use the feedback feature for right and wrong questions to tell students what to do next.

I can see several applications for this new feature including:

  • Did you tell a story in class?  Upload a video of you telling the main story and ask questions about it.  (Of course your class version will be different.)  If the student gets the question right, ask them a follow up question in the feedback.  If they get it wrong, ask them to review the video.  I particularly am excited about this because I’ve had students ask to be able to hear the story more and this would be a great way to check their understanding.
  • Writing practice.  Yes, a boring close activity, but ask students several fill in the blank questions.  If they get it right – great!  If they get it wrong, direct them to review their notes (or a webpage or an activity or whatever you deem appropriate.)
  • No Homework Pass!  If students get above a certain score they don’t have to do homework that evening.  I think I would use this selectively and I would have enough questions on there that I would feel certain that they had a good grasp of the objectives.  I also wouldn’t tell them it was an option until the very end of the quiz.
  • Have an #authres you are using as an IPA?  Give quick feedback to students for them to know if they are understanding correctly.  If they get it wrong, you can even direct them to a more scaffolded version of the #authres to try again.